Friday, February 19, 2021

Beers & Books LI – Umberto Eco

Well, rather Wine &Words
 

"You die,
but most of what you have accumulated
will not be lost;
you are leaving a message in a bottle."

 "Umberto Eco (5 January 1932 – 19 February 2016)

19 comments:

  1. Hmm... I am inclined to think that most of what I have accumulated is already lost, and I am not even dead yet (but then, I am not Umberto Eco, obviously)

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    1. Well, I like the thought he left not but one message in one bottle, but quite a few in many bottles, which in his case turn out to be books.
      So you are going to leave some fine messages, too, once upon a time when you will be following me and my donkey.

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  2. I expect to disappear without a trace, swept out with my accumulations...

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    1. So do I. To leave some messages in a bottle is a nice thought, isn't it?

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    2. Perhaps - for those who have messages worth leaving.

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  3. Perhaps 'Beer' has come to symbolise the appropiate fine alcoholic beveredge.

    photographsnowords.blogspot.com has just been granted approval for official release!

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    1. The reason I started this series was a beer called "Lancaster Bomber". So "Beers & Books" made sense. Meanwhile I do feel a bit trapped, trying to find way to get rid of "Drink!".

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    2. Trapped indeed, for you once told me you would stop at 50. Too late for that now, obviously.

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    3. Too late insofar as I'd like to continue presenting a few authors and their books.

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    4. Seems to be widening into Booze and Books though.

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  4. I enjoy Umberto Eco. I have 3 of his novels in French. Gifts from a Montreal niece. On my own, I got his "Experiences in TRANSLATION".It comes from 3 lectures he gave at the Toronto University, October 1998. I wish I had been able to attend. I had so many questions about French translation. I was told he was great at teaching, and he kept the sessions going as long as there were questions.

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    1. "Experiences in Translation" sounds very interesting. Imagine, Claude, we had been able to attend his lectures together. ;-)
      I hope one of the three novels is "Foucault's Pendulum", because this one he thought is his best.

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    2. Oui! Le Nom de la Rose, L'ile du jour levant, La Pendule de Foucault. Aucun facile a lire.

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  5. I'm leaving,not a bottle but, a big plastic box to my grandson. To open, if he is interested, when he will be thirty. Filled with memory writings, poetry attempts, great letters sent to and received from well known and anonymous-yet-fascinating people. Books written by friends and photos with autographs. Links to blogs I participated (hoping they are still accessible). We all have a story to tell, in words and pictures.

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    1. Your idea is a lovely one. Suppose by now Ethan is about 17, 18 years old. I wish I could witness when in 2033 or 2034 you let him open the box. ;-)
      Each of my grandchildren will find newspapers in several languages published on their birthday, a very special book with dedication and a letter handwritten on their birthday. If I live long enough I might add another letter.

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    2. Wow!Love your legacy.đź’•đź’•

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  6. Tuesday, at noon, I'm having a TVAR (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Repair).
    It's a year late because of Covid lockdown.I hope it works well. If not, I had a long run anyhow. I'm grateful.
    And I certainly had an interesting time in your company. Also with dear Andrew's blog. Thank you both for putting up with me. ����

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    1. Dear Claude, my good thoughts will be with you. As optimism is the only "ism" I might build a fane for, I am looking forward to your soonish return into Andrew's and my world. Feel yourself hugged, Claude. Tout de coeur. ;-)

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