Monday, March 16, 2009

Wife of Bath

Yesterday, on the Ides of March, and thus 2055 years after Caesar rattled "Et tu, Brutus?" and three years after Bock the Robber wrote his first post; 93 years after Austria-Hungary declared war to Portugal, 83 years after the first telephone-line between London and Berlin started to work, 53 years after the first performance of "My Fair Lady" in New York and on the 102nd Birthday of Zarah Leander who once sang "Ich weiƟ, es wirrrd einmal ein Wunnn...derrrrr gescheh'n ..." (I know there will once happen a wonder ...), and one year after I went down in history, out of the blue I felt fancy to enjoy re-reading Chaucer's Wife of Bath. Well, and this morning I found myself typing Chaucer Wife of Bath youtube and, although it was ... hm ... not exactly what I had hoped to find, after about nine minutes I thought 'Nice idea, anyway' and decided to share it.




Enjoyed a bit?
Fine. And now to the main course.
At least in case you have not enjoyed the pleasure, yet, you should switch to the original.
As an exception from the rule - if you were I you'd always prefer to feel the book in your hands - here are the links to both the .... [writing all adjectives would take too long] ... Prologue and the Tale.

3 comments:

  1. The students did very well. Chosing Clint Mansel's "Requiem for a Dream" as background music was genius. It kept the story flowing...

    As for Chaucer, amazing that he would have known so well the complexity of a liberated woman's heart, body and soul, without having read first Betty Friedan's "Feminine Mystique".

    'Nothing new under the sun' wrote the Ecclesiastes, long before Chaucer and Friedan were born. I'm sure he had met a few interesting wives when he was penning his wise sayings.

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  2. D.E.,
    nice an idea, isn't it? Even now, while writing this, I find myself smiling again.

    Claudia,
    almost exactly what I thought. Sometimes

    As for your third paragraph: Born (appr.) when Daffyd ap Gwilym was 23 and had just seven more years to write his poems, Chaucer had about 27 years more time than my favourite bard to meet women. Thus, you might not be wrong. :)

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